Cultivating Happiness

Cultivating Happiness

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  • Cultivating Happiness

We are all hardwired with a ‘negativity bias', something designed by evolution to keep us safe and alive by readily picking up on potential threats and embedding learning from bad experiences. For many of us this tendency can end up feeling more like a permanent state, leaving us suffering from things like over-reactivity, excessive worrying, perpetual pessimism, and interpersonal conflicts.

The good news is the brain is an organ that learns and changes dependent on our experiences. In essence, whatever we repeatedly sense and feel is sculpting our neural structure and pathways, and if we can learn to focus on positive experiences, we can overcome this tilt in our brains towards negativity.

Drawing on research, Dr. Rick Hanson has developed a programme called ‘Taking in the Good’, designed to grow our inner strengths and resilience, cultivate a more realistically optimistic outlook, positive mood and sense of self worth. By actively taking in positive experiences through mindfulness, we can benefit from the phenomenon of “self-directed neuroplasticity”. Bit by bit, synapse by synapse, we can develop the skills to counter this ‘negativity bias’ and cultivate happiness.

In this one-day workshop, based on Dr. Rick Hanson's programme, you will:

• Identify how and why the brain has a “negativity bias” and the effects this has on our well-being;

• Gain a deeper scientific understanding of “self-directed neuroplasticity,” where we can use our minds to change the shape and functioning of our brains over time—the basis of long-term health and happiness;

• Learn which positive experiences can meet your three essential needs for safety, satisfaction and connection and how you can use these to build inner strength;

• Learn Dr. Rick Hanson’s four-step HEAL method that imprints everyday positive experiences in the memory system to help us feel strong, happy, peaceful, and loved;

• Explore methods to lower anxiety and stress, lift mood, develop calm and contentment, and fundamentally hardwire happiness into our brain and lives.

Notes:

  • No prior mindfulness experience required.

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