Monthly Archives: September 2016

  • Staying Mindful This Autumn

    It’s the time of harvest festivals, brightly coloured leaves and bonfires. Like any season, the joys of Autumn can pass us by all too quickly if we don’t pay attention. There are of course many reasons to dislike the season too – it’s getting colder and the evenings are getting steadily darker. However, whether we enjoy Autumn or not, it provides many mindfulness bells – prompts that remind us to come back into the moment and experience it fully.

    Mindfulness in Autumn

    Fruits of Autumn

    The first half of the season has a real feeling of abundance to it. Even the smallest green spaces may contain a blackberry bush, a rosehip bush or a hawthorn tree. Taking a moment to pick fruit is a great way for us to stop what we’re doing and become present in our surroundings.

    There are still a few late blackberries hanging here and there, so why not use them as an exercise in mindful eating? Notice how the berry looks and how it feels when you pick it. Does it squish in your fingers, leaving a dark purple stain? How does it taste? Bitter? Sweet? It’s also a good reminder to feel gratitude – for your taste buds, for the fruit, for the moment.

    A Chill in the Air

    There’s no denying it – summer is definitely over. Although many of us probably take the time to be mindful of the summer sun on our skin, how many of us give the colder weather such attention? We tend to notice and appreciate things we like in life, and begrudge those that we believe we hate.

    Instead of just thinking ‘Oh, I hate the cold!’, why not try using it to become more present in your body? Notice the chill on your face, how the wind ruffles your hair. You don’t have to enjoy it, but being mindful of it may bring new feelings and sensations. As well as the weather, we can enjoy the warmth and softness of our scarf, the snugness of our coat or the comfort of a hot cup of tea when we return home.

    Spiders

    Not all of us are afraid of spiders, but for many people this season can be anxiety-inducing because there are so many big spiders about! Yet even these creepy crawlies are mindfulness bells in disguise. Spotting one our eight-legged friends may at first send you into a panic, but mindfulness isn’t just about savouring the good stuff, it’s about noticing when we’re suffering too. Can you be present in and accepting of the anxiety? Can you take a deep, steadying breath, and get some perspective – that it’s just a spider? And if that doesn’t work and you totally freak out, can you show yourself some self-compassion and forgiveness?

    Bonfires and Fireworks

    As the nights draw in and the trees become bare, at least we have the warmth of a bonfire to look forward to. Bonfire nights and firework displays offer a treat for all the senses. We can savour how the heat of a bonfire warms our cold faces, the smell of burning wood, the bang of exploding fireworks or the sound of happy voices around us, the bursts of colour in the night sky, maybe even the taste of a hotdog or jacket potato. Appreciating these physical sensations can bring a whole new level of enjoyment to these traditional events.

    The Coming of Winter

    While there are many things to enjoy about Autumn, for some of us it may be a worrying time. Depression can worsen due to the dark mornings and evenings, and we may feel more socially isolated, stuck in our homes away from the cold. The cold can also exacerbate some physical conditions. We may also be struck with a sense of loss; with the leaves falling from the trees it can be a harsh reminder that everything eventually ends.

    Yet even here we can cultivate mindfulness. The seasons change, just as we change. We all go through our own personal seasons, times of light and sunshine, and then times of dark and cold. We’re not separate from nature in this way; we’re inextricably linked with its transitory cycles. If we can accept the changing weather, we might take one step closer to accepting our own changeability.

    But just as winter will again become spring, our darkest moments also pass. If winter proves to be a difficult time, our discomfort can be a mindfulness bell for compassion, self-love, and maybe even forgiveness of ourselves for not being consistent and steady all of the time. By practicing mindfulness, we can build internal bonfires, to bring us comfort all year round, despite the changing nature of ourselves and our world.

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    MEDITATION:

    Changing Seasons Meditation

    Body Scan

    COURSES/WORKSHOPS:

    New Year's Resolution Workshop